Coginitive bias that effect your travel brand

The human brain, in all its glory, also has many imperfections. That means that the way we perceive the world does not necessarily reflect what the world looks like. On the one hand, our brain is a very subjective tool that helps us live in a world full of stimuli; on the other hand, it’s […]
two women traveling by train looking through a window


The human brain, in all its glory, also has many imperfections. That means that the way we perceive the world does not necessarily reflect what the world looks like. On the one hand, our brain is a very subjective tool that helps us live in a world full of stimuli; on the other hand, it’s a source of generalizations and stereotypes.

One of the quirks of this powerful organ is cognitive bias – an irrational way of perceiving reality.

Building your brand is a process that requires looking at the environment from a completely different perspective. It often forces us to put on the shoes of our audience and forget our own beliefs. Therefore, understanding some cognitive errors and trying to eliminate them can positively affect our actions.

Below are some common cognitive biases that we believe can affect your business.

Content:

Cognitive bias: Mere exposure effect

If you’re interested in brand strategy, you’re probably familiar with the statement that the more times someone has come into contact with your brand, the more likely they are to use your services. Marketing campaigns are also built on this belief.

It has its basis in psychology. This phenomenon is called the mere exposure effect and is manifested in the fact that a person is willing to change their mind about something after having had contact with it a sufficient number of times.

In marketing, it is said that a person needs to see your message from 7 to 15 times to trust you and buy your service. These numbers may vary, but keep in mind that the number of times someone has contact with your brand matters.

❌ You might be afraid that you will tire the audience with a repetitive message. But don’t forget, however, that social media cuts the reach of your posts, and subscribers do not always open every email they get from you.

✔️ Therefore, repeating the same information that may seem boring to you may help others make a decision. The same happens with the elements of visual identity. The more consistently it is used, the greater the chance of it being remembered.

Cognitive bias: Omission effect

Some time ago, during an event we organized for my readers (during which you could get a free brand audit), I heard stories of people who, daily, prefer not to take action due to the fear of making a mistake.

The omission bias occurs precisely when we decide not to act out of fear of loss, even when staying passive may be just as or more harmful. We forget that lack of decision is already a decision.

❌ Fear of consequences accompanies many entrepreneurs. Sometimes it’s hard to take matters into your own hands and take risks when there is even the smallest chance of failure (even when the chance of winning is high, and success could truly change our lives).

✔️ The small-steps method can help you get used to the vision of failure and make it an integral part of the process. Changing your attitude can help you get rid of fear and become more innovative.

Confirmation bias

Have you ever stuck to your own belief even if all the signs in heaven and earth showed you were wrong?

Confirmation bias occurs when we persistently try to validate our ideas, even if it is objectively not right.

This may happen when, for example, you come up with a brilliant idea for a new product, but after conducting market research, it turns out that the idea is not as interesting for your audience as you initially thought. In panic, you look for arguments proving them wrong.

✔️ This is quite a dangerous mistake and can result in you making the wrong decisions. Knowing that this is happening is the first step to avoiding it. Try to listen to others and don’t take their opinion personally. Remember that any feedback, even the critical one, may contribute to the improvement of your offer or product.

Out-group homogeneity bias

When we travel and tell our friends about our adventures, we often generalize the behavior of locals and throw them into one bag. It helps us understand the world around us, but it also creates a risk of missing important information and creating hurtful stereotypes.

Awareness of this cognitive bias will come in handy when you create a brand intended for other markets with a completely different culture, for people with a different sexual orientation/identity, gender, people of different skin color, and/or age.

✔️ Good market research and the ability to listen are essential. It is also worth being generally interested in what is happening around you.

Cognitive bias: Serial position effect

‘First impressions count.’ We remember it, we go to an interview, get ready for a meeting, and plan our first date. It makes perfect sense. Once people form an opinion about someone or something, they take that first impression as a point of reference. It’s hard to change it.

You already know that we often treat brands as human beings, so in this case, the first impression matters as well. Your audience creates opinions and expectations very soon, whether you’re building your brand or a corporate empire.

✔️ That’s why it’s so important to take care of each touchpoint. The way you reply to emails, how your website looks, or the language used in the offer sent to the client. Every detail matters to be remembered in the right way.

If you’ve found yourself in these situations, don’t feel guilty. Cognitive biases are part of us, and everyone is exposed to them. However, it is worth remembering them if you want to build a brand based on objective information.

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